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Nutrition

Nutritional meals don't need to be boring!

Nutrition is key to healthy living, but this doesn't mean you need to make do with bland, boring food.

Great taste and imagination are also important factors, especially when you're trying to get people excited about eating healthily, according to the managing director of catering company Cucina.co.uk, Steve Quinn.

While nutritional supplements are one option, there are plenty of culinary options when it comes to making sure you get your omega-3, vitamins and minerals in your diet.

Mr Quinn recommends superfoods, which can be used alongside other ingredients to enhance the flavour and nutritional value of meals.

"Fish, which is rich in omega-3, is always good, especially salmon, herring, sardines and mackerel," he explained. "Blueberries and apples set among other fruits are also a good idea."

He suggests complementing meals with foods high in unsaturated fats, such as extra virgin olive oil or sunflower oil.

Tomatoes, avocadoes, yoghurts and Brazil nuts are also great high-nutrition foods which serve as either a snack or part of a main meal.

Mr Quinn believes taste, nutrition, imagination and presentation should always come to the fore when making enticing snacks, underlining the importance of given yourself time to prepare food.

Preparing food yourself not only helps you get more excited about your meals, but reduces your intake of processed foods, which are notoriously high in salt, sugars and saturated fats.

Heart UK dietician Linda Main recently claimed that around three-quarters of our daily average intake of salt comes from processed food, underlying the significant benefits of cutting back.

Saturated and trans fats are also more of a problem in processed foods, increasing the levels of bad cholesterol in the blood stream, which in turn increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases such as coronary heart disease.

"A good diet, rich in fruit, vegetables, wholegrain cereals and low in saturated fat and salt is a key part of managing raised cholesterol," explained Linda Main.

Posted by Matilda Jones

 
 
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